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Social Wish List: Livefyre Comments Post to Google+

July 21, 2014 Leave a comment

Livefyre to G+

Social commenting is a great thing. It allows people to bring in other people to the conversation, allowing for a deeper, richer understanding.

And that’s one of the reasons why I love Livefyre, a company that has grown to include products for “real-time conversation, social curation and social advertising.”

But I’d like to focus on the real-time conversation aspect in this post with LiveComments.

LiveComments love

I love LiveComments and the ability to use them to integrate into other channels and bring others into the conversation. I use it when I comment on sites with LiveComments to push my comments and share a social link to Twitter. And I’ve been drawn into conversations on LiveComments through social shares to Twitter by others.

But there is one thing missing with LiveComments.

Google+ use

Yes, I said it. Google+. You might be thinking that no one is using Google+.

You’d be wrong, as Digital Marketing Ramblings shows.

Google+ might not be as popular as Facebook or Twitter, as endearing as Instagram and Pinterest, or as fun as Snapchat or Tinder.

But it does have a fan base the consists of photographers, marketers, foodies, writers and more. And a lot of these people are not only using Google+ daily, but also using it as or near the top of their social networks.

And that means companies should not be afraid to pour time and resources into a product that would integrate with the network.

Will Google+ last?

A valid point. With the loss of Vic Gundotra from Google, it does put a bit of doubt into the long-term viability of Google+. Gundotra was one of the founders of the social media network.

However, Google will surely not look to close down Google+, not with its integration with Google Authorship and its competition for search data collection.

I am no expert on Google+, but I don’t see it as a tool that will be folded like Buzz or Wave were. Google has too much riding on the success — or at least continuation of — Google+ to see it be yet another product that it closes down.

How it could work

I think one area in which this could be especially well received is in Google+ communities. Communities are a great feature on the social network, and they would serve as a fair way to share content and get people involved in the conversation.

That’s especially true considering that communities range from hyper specific to more broader terms.

And it would be a great added feature to be able to mention people in your circles, just as you are able to mention people you follow on Twitter or are friends with on Facebook.

It certainly makes sense to also enable comment sharing to an individual user’s home feed. Or even to dictate which circles could see that you are commenting on a story, especially if that story or blog post pertains to only one or two of your circles.

Bring it to Google+

Google+ still has a large user base using the network regularly, and Livefyre would do well to include it into its commenting userface.

How to Use Facebook Debugger

July 14, 2014 Leave a comment

Facebook Debugger

Every day millions of links are shared on Facebook. And we know that the best way to get people to click on those shares is to have a good visual attached to them.

So when you have a piece of content that you want to share, you want to make sure it appears how you want it to appear. Nothing is as bad as a link share on Facebook that has an incorrect image attached.

That’s when Facebook Debugger can help.

What is Facebook Debugger?

Facebook Debugger is a tool that allows you to see “helpful feedback about your page markup,” Facebook says.

That means you can use it to see how the code of the website displays when shared on Facebook.

The results page will spill out a lot of technical information on what Facebook is seeing in the URL that you input.

How do you use Facebook Debugger?

All you need to do is open up Debugger and paste the URL into the field. The results page will give you the following:

  • scraped information
  • object properties
  • share preview
  • raw Open Graph document information
  • like button warnings that should be fixed
  • Open Graph warnings that should be fixed

How can you use this information?

Simply put, you can use this to make sure what you are about to share on Facebook is displaying how you want it to display. This is especially helpful to content creators.

One error that I see frequently is the correct thumbnail image is not displaying with the link preview. Using Facebook Debugger works to make sure the correct thumbnail image displays or can be chosen from among a handful. That ensures that the visual content you want shared is displaying correctly.

New share preview

As I mentioned, the results page gives a share preview. This is a new feature of the tool, and it’s one of the best features of it. Take a look at it:

Talk Tools on Social Media Day

June 23, 2014 1 comment

Social Media Day

Social Media Day is just a week away, on Monday, June 30.

And, as part of a day-long activities from the Social Solutions Collective, you can chat we me and Amy Baumcratz of Hospitality Social Magnet about tools on Twitter. The chat will be held from 5 to 6 p.m. CDT.

You can find more information about the Twitter chat and other events at the Social Solutions Collective page.

Your thoughts

What kinds of questions about tools would you like us to answer or address? Leave your questions in the comments and will will try to answer them.

HOW TO: Optimize Storify for SEO

June 16, 2014 2 comments

Optimize Storify SEO

You have an idea in your head for a social media story and you plan to use Storify to make it. Even though you haven’t started curating content, you should be thinking about one critical element: Headline.

Why?

It’s pretty simple: Storify takes your headline and uses it to create the URL. You want to make sure your headline is optimized for search engines.

Curate with headline in mind

To do that, you’ll want to start the curation process with a headline in mind. You don’t need to write it on Storify’s curation canvas, but keep it somewhere, on a scrap of paper or in your mind, before you start curating.

It’s OK if the headline you have in mind is not one you end up with. It might not matter to you what the headline is on Storify.com, especially if you plan to embed the Storify on your website or blog, especially if you’re trying to drive more traffic there.

Then curate your content. Once you have curated your content, make sure that what you have pulled in meshes with the headline that you had in your mind before you started creating. If it does, you can move to the next step. If it doesn’t, you’ll want to tweak your headline.

Key in on keywords

Then think of any keywords you can use in your headline that might be applicable. You don’t want to stuff keywords into your headline, but if there is one or two that could create a more fluid headline, go ahead.

Then you want to take your headline and shorten it so that the keywords are prevalent. After all, those are the words you want in the Storify URL.

Then write your headline online if you have not already done so.

How to edit URL

If you wrote your headline on the Storify curation form and want to change it, you can, but it’s not readily apparent.

First you will need to hit “Settings” on the top black bar. Then, on the popup, hit “Edit URL.”

Make sure your Storify saves and then finish with the rest of your curation process, and you’ll have a headline optimized for search engines.

Categories: marketing, social media Tags: ,

4 Reasons You Should Use Listly as Your Blogroll

June 9, 2014 8 comments
listly-blogroll

An visual example of how Listly list looks when used as a blogroll.

I use a lot of social media tools in my weekly personal and professional lives. And one tool that I adore is Listly.

It’s pretty self-explanatory: It’s a tool to make, curate and vote on lists. But it can be much more than that if you harness it correctly.

What do you think when you first hear about a tool to make lists? Groceries, tasks to do and more, probably.

But Listly can be much more than just a tool for everyday tasks. It can be a tool that you can group similar things or ask a question or save things from around the web.

Yet one way Listly shines is as a blogroll tool. Here are 4 reasons why.

1. It’s open for collaboration

As a blogger, I have a small set of time to use to work on writing, editing and publishing. That’s why anything or any tool that I can use to save time is a good thing. Listly provides that with its open collaboration. Let others help curate a blogroll and you can focus your time on other pursuits.

2. You can embed it

What good is making a list if you can’t use it on your blog? No worries with Listly, though, as you can embed it on your blog and replace your long-standing, but often forgotten blogroll.

3. It’s visually heavy

Across social media, no matter where you look, one thing is common: Visuals stand out. So when you have a choice between making something stand out visually or having it be text-based or a drop-down menu, the visual way to display the information is the one that should win.

4. You have several display options

What are the best blogs to follow? Collaborators can let you know by voting, if you enable it. Then they can quickly see which are the best blogs to read. Or you can display it alphabetically, the default for a blogroll. Either way, you have options, and they don’t end with those two.

Listly is your blogroll

These are the main reasons why Listly should be the tool you use when you build your blogroll. (And hey, you can even use someone else’s list if you find one you like.)

But there are other great ways to use Listly on your blog, like for your guest blog posts. It’s a great tool to use

Social Wish List: No Thumbnail Image for Facebook Page Link Shares

March 17, 2014 Leave a comment
Facebook Link Share No Thumbnail

Thank you, Facebook, for once again allowing some pages to share links without a thumbnail image.

Note: This post was written before Facebook apparently allowed at least some pages to again post link shares with no thumbnail image. So thank you, Facebook. – Dan

Facebook has undergone a lot of changes in the past year, but one that has stuck a thorn in the side of many people is that pages must post an image when sharing links.

Facebook took away the option to post link shares with no thumbnails last summer for the pages that I manage. And I have been hearing and reading from others that they have lost that option since that time, too.

Whatever, Facebook.

We don’t care if you took it away to make people’s News Feed more visual. We just don’t care. Sometimes, we (as marketers) want to share links that don’t have an image. We know you gave us the option to upload our own, but that’s not always possible or applicable.

So quit acting like a belligerent teenager who’s making incessantly annoying rules in your own bedroom.

Facebook listens

I was planning to post this asking Facebook to bring back the option for pages to post links with no thumbnail image. But Facebook beat me to the punch.

As you can see with the photo that accompanies this post, I have the option to post link shares with no thumbnail image on all the Facebook pages that I manage.

I had not heard that Facebook was bringing this feature back, but I am very thankful that they did.

Let’s face it, Facebook should give the page managers the option to do so. And why not? If the content they share is not ranked highly, let it be so. Maybe marketers will stop sharing them automatically.

But maybe not. Maybe they want to share it because it’s a key part of their strategy.

Either way, thank you for giving us (or some of us, at least) the option to post link shares without mandating that an image accompany the link.

Note: If you manage a Facebook page, leave a comment to tell me if you have this option. Thank you!

Social Wish List: Dailymile and Strava Channels on IFTTT

February 17, 2014 4 comments
The day when you hit your goal mileage -- 1,200 -- and your top speed -- 41.2 mph -- during the same ride. #bikeschool #Trek #SeenOnMyRide #cycling

I would love to be able to take the Strava data recorded on my smartphone and send it straight to Dailymile. Please, IFTTT, help put the Web to work for me.

I am an avid recreational cyclist. I love to go for long rides in the penetratingly exasperating heat of July. And I love to push my body to its fastest on tough short local courses.

Regardless of the type of ride that I go on, I log my miles and information into Dailymile, a social network dedicated to fitness.

But the app that I use to record my rides on my smartphone is Strava, a cycling-focused app that is used by the top professionals in the world.

This is where I would bring in IFTTT, putting the power of the web for my personal use. IFTTT is one of my favorite tools, and it performs functions that make my life so much easier. It automates tasks and chores that make my daily web use run smoother and faster, and it frees up my time to do other tasks, like being social on social media.

And while IFTTT does a great job expanding and growing, I would love to request that the site make channels for Strava and Dailymile.

I would love to see users create recipes that transfers data between the two networks. I would love to be able to record a ride on Strava with its GPS feature and have the map of my ride transferred to Dailymile.

Automation is where IFTTT shines, and this is one more way in which my social efforts could use some automation tricks.

Reader feedback: What channels would you like to see IFTTT include?

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