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Like or Comment: What Do You Think of This Facebook Marketing Tactic?

Like Comment Facebook Marketing TacticLikes. Comments.

When you interact with a page on Facebook, those are the two most common ways you will do so.

And, a new Facebook marketing is asking you to choose one of those responses.

This is what happens: A page will post an update (link share or photo, generally) and ask those who see the post to like if they agree with one option and comment if they agree with another option.

In other words, it’s a poll using Facebook actions. You can see an example above from the KLM UK Facebook page.

Legitimate or lame?

Why this tactic could be legitimate: Likes and comments are at least two of the metrics you measure for your Facebook success.

Why this tactic could be lame: If you want to set up a poll, you can do so; Facebook has that option already.

A lesson from big brands

Marketing tactics can sometimes have a trickle down effect, meaning big brands use them and then smaller brands adopt them. However, I perused most of the Top 20 brands on Facebook, according to FanPageList.com. None of the brand pages I looked through were using this tactic.

In fact, most brands often posted unique, brand-specific content as opposed to memes or other content that was not original to the brand. (Surely that’s one reason those are top brands on Facebook.)

But I digress: My point is KLM UK could have found some other way to use the above content without asking for fans to vote via likes or comments.

Measuring the efforts

Think about this: If a brand posts a one of these (a Facebook-action poll), does it hurt engagement numbers? For instance, if someone really wanted to like the photo above but didn’t want to vote for Africa, they might have left the content without liking or commenting.

Brands could measure this by comparing Consumers vs. Reach for Facebook-action poll posts versus other similar (photos to photos, link share to link share) posts as Jon Loomer suggests as a Facebook Insights ratio to monitor.

This is not a tactic that I have used, though, so I have no data to compare and contrast.

A call for action

But brands asking for likes or comments usually is not a bad thing. In fact, as Hubspot points out, calls to action on Facebook lead to more likes and comments (and more shares if the CTA is “share”).

In that light, providing a CTA is not a bad thing. But posturing the content as a Facebook-action poll could be.

What do you think: Is this a tactic that should be embraced or scorned by marketers?

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  1. July 26, 2013 at 10:53 pm

    I like this approach, it engages them. I feel like if they set a poll up, NO ONE would use it! And it would almost be embarrassing because they would see that their efforts failed numerically.

    • July 28, 2013 at 8:40 am

      I think you’re right; the Facebook built-in poll probably wouldn’t get as much engagement. Thanks for the comment, GiGi!

  2. September 28, 2013 at 2:01 am

    Great post. Good info about facebook marketing. We Are Social Experts – is a USA based Social Media Company. We offer the most recent news on social media and tips on using Facebook. You can get it from here http://fbme.wearesocialexperts.com/video-series/

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